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Cornell College Housekeeping Management Strategies Paper

Research Paper-Management Style AssignmentThe purpose of this assignment is to evaluate how you would handle each situation. Each answer should be 1-2 pages in length and include what type of management styles/strategies are observed or would you use. Please do not write the question in your essay. Refer to the management styles in your textbook. This assignment must have a cover page and reference page. Please write this paper in essay form and answer each question. You may also refer to scholarly articles or supporting research to support your position. For example, in question #3, you may want to refer to articles which address social media in the workplace. APA Format is required. This assignment is due on 10/29/19 in class.You are a brand-new manager to the organization. The director is your trainer. While walking through the property, you notice that she picks up a $100 bill from the floor and places it in her pocket. At the end of the day, you both walk out of the hotel to the parking lot. You realize she never turned in the money or reported to lost and found. One day later, the guest reported missing the $100 bill. How would you handle this situation?You and Mark are both Housekeeping managers. You have been friends since college and are neighbors. Mark is the person who helped get you this job. Mark has been having personal problems and has arrived at work 2 hours late for three days straight. Mark pulls you aside and asks if you could tell the director that Mark has arrived on time each day. How would you handle this situation?You are the manager of property XYZ. Sally called in sick for her shift. Tommy who is Sally’s co-worker informs you that Sally is posting party pictures on Facebook and does not appear to be ill. How would you handle this situation?You and the director of the property are inspecting rooms. In one of the rooms, you notice bed bugs. You inform the director and he tells you to ignore it since the hotel is sold out and we would not be able to move the guest to another room. How would you handle this situation?Your two best employees begin to argue about who is doing more work. As you hear them argue, you begin to walk towards them. Once you arrive, both employees are pushing each other. They immediately stop once you have arrived. Both were apologetic for their actions. Your hotel has a zero-tolerance policy about physical confrontation. HR advises that both should be terminated. How would you handle this situation?

Thomas J. A. Jones ffirs.tex V3 – 08/06/2007 2:33pm Page iii
Professional Management of
Housekeeping Operations
FIFTH EDITION

Thomas J. A. Jones, Ed. D., R. E. H.
William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC.
Thomas J. A. Jones ffirs.tex V3 – 08/06/2007 2:33pm Page ii
Thomas J. A. Jones ffirs.tex
V3 – 08/06/2007 2:33pm Page i
Professional Management of
Housekeeping Operations
FIFTH EDITION
Thomas J. A. Jones ffirs.tex V3 – 08/06/2007 2:33pm Page ii
Thomas J. A. Jones ffirs.tex V3 – 08/06/2007 2:33pm Page iv
This book is printed on acid-free paper.
c 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
Copyright
Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey.
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Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and author have used their best efforts in
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completeness of the contents of this book and specifically disclaim any implied warranties of
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representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be
suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the
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Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data:
Jones, Thomas J. A.
Professional management of housekeeping operations / by Thomas
J. A. Jones. – 5th ed.
p. cm.
Originally published: Profesional management of housekeeping
operations / Robert J. Martin. 1986.
Includes index.
ISBN 978-0-471-76244-7 (cloth)
1. Hotel housekeeping. I. Title.
TX928.M37 2007
647.94092–dc22
2007011319
Printed in the United States of America.
10
9
8
7
6
5 4
3
2
1
Thomas J. A. Jones ffirs.tex

To Humphrey S. Tyler,
a pioneer in the cleaning industry,
and to my family

V3 – 08/06/2007 2:33pm Page v
Thomas J. A. Jones ffirs.tex V3 – 08/06/2007 2:33pm Page vi
Thomas J. A. Jones ftoc.tex V2 – 08/06/2007 2:34pm Page vii
Contents

Preface
3
xi
PART I
THE HOUSEKEEPING PROFESSION
AND THE PRINCIPLES OF
MANAGEMENT
1
1
The Executive Housekeeper and
Scientific Management
3
Origins of Hospitality and Housekeeping
Origins of Management
4
Principles of Management
8
Management Theory and the Executive
Housekeeper
10
Normative Characteristics Exhibited by
Housekeeping Employees
10
Motivation and Productivity
11
Management Theory and Housekeeping
Administration
18
New Horizons in Management
19
2
Conceptual Planning
A Word about Team Staffing
46
Team Scheduling Is Not Team Cleaning
Standing Rotational Scheduling and Tight
Scheduling
49
Union Contracts and Their Effects on
Scheduling
59
4
3
PART II
PLANNING, ORGANIZING, AND
STAFFING THE NEW
ORGANIZATION
25
5
120
Material Planning: Bedding, Linens, and
Uniforms
138
Bedding
138
Bath and Table Linens
Uniforms
145
8
103
Material Planning: Supplies and
Equipment
106
Housekeeping Chemicals
106
Cleaning Supplies and Equipment
Guest Supplies
133
7
72
Material Planning: Floors, Walls, and
Windows
78
Cleaning for Health
78
Floor Types and Their Care
79
Carpets and Rugs
93
Ceilings and Wall Coverings
101
Windows and Window Treatments
6
48
Material Planning: Administration of
Equipment and Supplies
61
Material Budgets
61
Inventory Control
63
Material Classification
63
Preopening Operations
64
Guestroom Furniture and Fixtures
66
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
27
The New Executive Housekeeper
27
The Executive Housekeeper’s Position within the
Organization
28
The Model Hotel
28
Reporting for Work
29
Early Priority Activities
30
House Breakout Plan
32
Staffing Considerations
37
Completion of the Department
Organization
38
The Staffing Guide
39
Table of Personnel Requirements
40
Job Descriptions
40
Planning to Schedule Workers: A Major
Advantage of Housekeeper Team
Staffing
46
142
Staffing for Housekeeping
Operations
150
Thomas J. A. Jones ftoc.tex V2 – 08/06/2007 2:34pm Page viii
viii

Contents
Job Specifications
150
Employee Requisition
151
Staffing Housekeeping Positions
9
Operational Planning
151
169
Procedures for Opening the House
170
Other Forms for Direction and Control: Standard
Operating Procedures
176
Examples of Standard Operating Procedures for
Hotels
178
Examples of Standard Operating Procedures for
Hospitals
181
Standard Operating Procedures Are Not to
Restrict Initiative
186
13 Housekeeping in Other Venues
PART III
DIRECTING AND CONTROLLING
ONGOING HOUSEKEEPING
OPERATIONS
189
10 The Hotel Housekeeping Daily Routine
of Department Management
191
The Housekeeping Day
191
Cleaning the Guestroom
201
Suite Hotels (with Kitchens, Fireplaces, and
Patios)
210
The Housekeeping Day Continued
214
Computers Come of Age in the World of
Housekeeping
225
11 Hotel Housekeeping Subroutines
232
Cleaning and Maintenance
233
Operational Controls
243
Purchasing
249
Personnel Administration
253
Communication and Training
258
Long-Range Planning
258
PART IV
SPECIAL TOPICS: SWIMMING POOL
OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT,
HOUSEKEEPING IN OTHER
VENUES, SAFEGUARDING OF
ASSETS, IN-HOUSE LAUNDRIES,
AND THE FULL CIRCLE OF
MANAGEMENT
269
12 Swimming Pool Operations and
Management
271
Components of a Swimming Pool
System
272
Pool Sizes and Shapes
273
Water Clarity
273
Types of Filters and How They Work
The Backwashing Cycle
275
The Spa
276
Water Chemistry
276
About Algae
277
Chloramines
277
Pool Equipment
277
About Diving Boards
278
Staffing (Using Lifeguards or Pool
Attendants)
278
274
280
Environmental Services: Nature of the
Profession
280
Basic Microbiology
282
The Five Types of Soil
284
The Chemistry of Cleaning
284
The Product Manufacturer and the Chemical
Challenge
286
Nonchemical Agents That Kill or Slow Bacterial
Growth
286
A Controlled Bacterial Environment
286
Terminal Cleaning and Disinfecting the Surgical
Suite
287
Disposition of Used Needles, Syringes, and
‘‘Sharps’’
287
Disposal of Refuse from Antineoplastic
Agents
289
Pest Control
290
Waste Disposal and Control
292
The Joint Commission (JCAHO)
293
Environmental Pollution
293
Ecology
294
The Housekeeper’s Role in Environmental
Management
296
Other Opportunities for Housekeepers
296
14 The Safeguarding of Assets: Concerns for
Safety and Security in Housekeeping
Operations
312
The Concept of Safeguarding Assets
312
Security from Theft in the Housekeeping
Department
314
Security within Hotel Guestrooms
321
The Do-Not-Disturb Sign Competes with the
‘‘Need to Foresee’’
323
Safety
324
The Loss Prevention Manual
328
Thomas J. A. Jones ftoc.tex V2 – 08/06/2007 2:34pm Page ix

Contents
15 The Laundry: Toward an Understanding
of Basic Engineering and Operational
Considerations
330
A Statement in Favor of On-Premises Laundry
Operations
330
Another View of the Efficacy of On-Premises
Laundry Operations
331
Planning and Preengineering
331
Basic Knowledge for the Owner
338
Major Equipment Requirements
341
Laundry Equipment for Larger Hotels
346
General Nonequipment Factors and
Requirements
347
16 The Full Circle of Management
Problem Solving
353
Managerial Styles
359
Development of Others
360
Personal Development
361
Housekeeping Managers of the Future
APPENDIX A:
Job Descriptions
Hotel Employee
Handbook
373
APPENDIX B:
367
353
Bally’s Casino Resort
Housekeeping Department Rules and
Regulations
383
APPENDIX C:
APPENDIX D:
Ozone in the Laundry
APPENDIX E:
What If (Publication)
389
391
Excerpts from InterContinental
Hotels Group Loss Prevention
Manual
400
APPENDIX F:
APPENDIX G:
The Personal Plan
APPENDIX H:
Microfiber Technology
APPENDIX I:
362
ix
Proteam Articles
411
421
National Trade Publications
Articles
439
APPENDIX J:
Glossary
Index
451
469
414
Thomas J. A. Jones ftoc.tex V2 – 08/06/2007 2:34pm Page x
Thomas J. A. Jones fpref.tex V2 – 08/06/2007 2:40pm Page xi
Preface

If the Fourth Edition could be compared to a ‘‘major
overhaul,’’ then the Fifth Edition is definitely a ‘‘finetuning.’’ Old wine is served up in new bottles in the
form of ethical issues confronting the housekeeping
department displayed as mini-case studies. It is hoped
that these cases will inspire both students and the
instructor to question the action (or inaction) of these
fictional professionals and arrive at the conclusion that
good business practices and ethical behavior are not
mutually exclusive.
In the housekeeping department there are numerous
traps waiting for the unwary executive housekeeper. So,
another set of mini-case studies and cautionary tales
has been introduced, called ‘‘Pitfalls in Housekeeping.’’
These pitfall case studies are intended to stimulate the
analytical problem-solving abilities of students. Students
need to realize that snap decisions influenced by
emotions and personal prejudice are not appropriate
management practices.
Several sections have been updated to reflect prevailing trends and conditions affecting the housekeeping
department. However, ‘‘green’’ remains our favorite
color. The focus on environmental health has continued
to grow in the industry since its introduction in these
pages in the last edition.
In the last edition ‘‘Executive Profiles’’ from Executive
Housekeeping Today were introduced, putting a human
face on the executive housekeeper. In this edition
discussion questions have been added so that students
may more closely identify with these professionals and
their management practices.
Acknowledgments

A special note of thanks to new contributors to the
Fifth Edition. Dan L. Freeman and Cyndee Westlund,
both vice presidents of Innovations Manufacturing &
Distributing, have generously allowed a representative
sample of their innovative products to appear in this
edition. Another note of thanks to Roger McFadden,
vice president of Technical Services at Coastwide Laboratories for his permission to reproduce a material data
safety sheet (MSDS) from Coastwide’s Sustainable Earth
chemical product line.
I would also like to thank the following instructors,
who provided helpful feedback through their reviews:
Duncan Dickson of the University of Central Florida,
Philip K. Ruthstrom of the Conrad N. Hilton College
of Hotel and Restaurant Management at the University
of Houston, and Susan Stafford of SUNY Tompkins
Cortland Community College.
One more individual must be singled out for his
lasting contribution, not only to this textbook, but to the
entire cleaning industry. Humphrey S. Tyler, former
owner of National Trade Publications, is without a
doubt the industry’s outspoken advocate of the need
for education at all levels in the cleaning industry. Due
to his efforts, and that of others such as Jim Harris, the
Cleaning Industry Research Institute (CIRI) was formed
two years ago. CIRI is intended to raise awareness of the
importance of cleaning through scientific research and
its mission is to create an enhanced positive public
perception of the health benefits and productivity
gains due to the cleaning industry. CIRI will act as a
clearinghouse and central source for information, and
will facilitate research and initiate scientific inquiry on
the cleaning function and cleanliness. It is also hoped
that CIRI will also advance techniques to improve indoor
environmental quality for all types of buildings and
uses, improve public understanding of the impact of
the cleaning and building maintenance functions on
public health, influence the development of public
policy regarding cleaning and health at all levels of
government, and provide credible research to help
standards setting organizations develop and disseminate
cleaning and maintenance best practices.
Even though Mr. Tyler has sold his publishing
company and he has retired from business, he remains
active as an officer and board member of CIRI. All of
the industry and certainly this author owe Mr. Tyler a
debt of gratitude for his unceasing commitment to the
advancement of the cleaning industry. It is for this reason
that this edition is dedicated to him.
Thomas J. A. Jones fpref.tex V2 – 08/06/2007 2:40pm Page xii
Thomas J. A. Jones p01.tex V2 – 08/06/2007 2:41pm Page 1
PART ONE

THE HOUSEKEEPING PROFESSION AND
THE PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
Since people have always traveled, there
has always been a need for housekeepers and hospitality. The function
of housekeepers has changed over the
years, from doing specific tasks to managing the people, material, and other
resources required for task accomplishment. In Part One we trace this change
and see how the developing science of
management relates to the profession
of executive housekeeping. We continue Mackenzie’s ordering of the principles of management, which include
the sequential functions of planning,
organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. These sequential functions will
be used as the organization structure
for Parts Two and Three of the book.
Part One of this edition also introduces
Atchison’s ‘‘Preparing for Change,’’ as
he separates the management of systems
and programs from the issues of leadership. (Part Four addresses special topics
and offers a summary of the book.)
Thomas J. A. Jones p01.tex V2 – 08/06/2007 2:41pm Page 2
Thomas J. A. Jones c02.tex V3 – 08/06/2007 2:44pm Page 3
CHAPTER 1

The Executive Housekeeper and Scientific
Management
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After studying the chapter, students should be able to:
1. From memory, describe how the role of
housekeepers has changed over the years.
2. Identify the management theorists mentioned in the chapter and describe each
theorist’s major contribution to the field.
3. From memory, list the three elements
managers work with, according to Mackenzie.
4. From memory, list the continuous and
sequential functions of management.
5. Given the basic activities associated
with the sequential functions, define
them and correctly associate each
with its sequential function.
6. List and describe five normative characteristics associated with housekeeping employees.
7. Explain why delegation is the key to managerial success.
8. Describe the link between rewards and
motivation.
9. Explain why there has been a shift away
from cleaning for appearance to cleaning
for health.
10. Differentiate between a manager and a
leader.
11. Define the key terms and concepts
at the end of the chapter.
Over the last 30 years the profession of executive
housekeeping has passed from the realm of art to
that of scientific management. Previously, professional
housekeepers learned technical skills related to keeping
a clean house. Now, the executive housekeeper and
other housekeeping supervisory personnel are not
only learning how to do such work but also how to
plan, organize, staff, direct, and control housekeeping
operations. They are learning how to inspire others to
accomplish this with a high degree of quality, concern,
and commitment to efficiency and cost control. In order
to understand how the art melds with the science, we
will trace the origins of professional housekeeping and
of scientific management.
Origins of Hospitality
and Housekeeping

Hospitality is the cordial and generous reception and
entertainment of guests or strangers, either socially or
commercially. From this definition we get the feeling
of the open house and the host with open arms, of a
place in which people can be cared for. Regardless of
the reasons people go to a home away from home, they
will need care. They will need a clean and comfortable
place to rest or sleep, food service, an area for socializing
and meeting other people, access to stores and shops,
and secure surroundings.
Americans have often been described as a people on
the move, a mobile society; and since their earliest history
Americans have required bed and board. Travelers
in the early 1700s found a hospitality similar to
that in their countries of origin, even though these
new accommodations may have been in roadhouses,
missions, or private homes and the housekeeping may
have included only a bed of straw that was changed
weekly.
Thomas J. A. Jones c02.tex V3 – 08/06/2007 2:44pm Page 4
4

CHAPTER 1
The Executive Housekeeper and Scientific Management
Facilities in all parts of young America were commensurate with the demand of the traveling public, and early
records indicate that a choice was usually available at
many trading centers and crossroads. The decision as
to where to stay was as it is today, based on where you
might find a location providing the best food, overnight
protection, and clean facilities. Even though the inns
were crude, they were gathering places where you could
learn the news of the day, socialize, find out the business
of the community, and rest.
With the growth of transportation—roadways, river
travel, railroads, and air travel—Americans became even
more mobile. Inns, hotels, motor hotels, resorts, and the
like have kept pace, fallen by the wayside, been overbuilt,
or been refurbished to meet quality demands.
Just as the traveler of earlier times had a choice,
there is a wide choice for travelers today. We therefore
have to consider seriously why one specific hotel or inn
might be selected over another. In each of the areas we
mentioned—food, clean room, sociable atmosphere,
meeting space, and security—there has been a need
to remain competitive. Priorities in regard to these
need areas, however, have remained in the sphere of
an individual property’s management philosophy.
CREATING PROPER ATTITUDES
In addition to the areas of hospitality we discussed,
professional housekeeping requires a staff with a sense of
pride. Housekeeping staffs must show concern for guests,
which will make the guests want to return—the basic
ingredient for growth in occupancy and success in the
hotel business. Such pride is best measured by the degree
to which the individual maids (guestroom attendants
or section housekeepers) say to guests through their
attitude, concern, and demeanor, ‘‘Welcome. We are
glad you chose to stay with us. We care about you and
want your visit to be a memorable occasion. If anything
is not quite right, please let us know in order that we
might take care of the problem immediately.’’
A prime responsibility of the executive housekeeper is
to develop this concern in the staff; it is just as important
as the other functions of cleaning bathrooms, making
beds, and making rooms ready for occupancy. Th…

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