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CJ 303 Southern New Hampshire Death Penalty in California Research

Topic: death penalty in California4 pages double spacing You are to write a double spaced three page paper (not including a citation page) that researches a single policy or program that has been implemented by a law enforcement agency, court system or corrections system. You may choose any of the following as your topic. If there is a program or policy you wish to assess that is not on this list, please clear with me beforehand. The policy or program must be very specific. Do not write about Stop and Frisk policies, write about the stop and frisk policy of a specific agency. Likewise, do not write about prison privatization generally, instead write about the policies of a particular county, state, etc. Here are the elements you must include in your paper:Identify the problem the policy or program sought to address. Indicate the reasons, history, or intent that led to the creation of the program or policy. Be specific!Review the history of the particular policy or programDiscuss any controversies the enactment of the policy or program createdAnalyze the impact of the policy/program and discuss any controversies it has generated.Evaluate the effectiveness of the policy and briefly discuss any alternatives
Again, this is a short paper and I don’t expect you to touch on every element you may find. You will need to be concise and specific. Cite your sources (use at least two) and use one of the standard styles (APA, MLA). You do not need to use a title page, but I expect a citation page.

Orange County, CA Safely Surrendered Babies
In 2006, a law was passed in California to reduce the number of babies dying from
“abandonment in unsafe locations” (Ball). With this law, parents can save the life of an infant by
surrendering “the infant within 72 hours of birth, no questions asked” (“CDSS Programs”). Since
the law was enacted, over 900 babies in California have been turned over to the Department of
Social Services (“Safely Surrendered Baby”). Texas has a similar law, the safe Haven law, which
gives parents 60 days to give up a child (Ball). In 2017, Orange County underwent a revision to
this policy and redefined guidelines for the Safely Surrendered Babies Law. Orange County’s
policy of safely surrendering babies seeks to provide a safe environment for infants, provides
strict procedures for parents should they desire to get their child back, and ultimately ensure that
the baby has a healthy chance at life.
Between 2001 and 2015, “23 total infants were reclaimed, there were also 171 infants
abandoned, 69 abandoned that survived and 103 abandoned who died” showing that a law for
surrendered babies is necessary to have (Ball). Specifically in Orange County, parents can
deliver their child to “a hospital emergency room, fire station with Safely Surrendered Baby
logo, or Orangewood Children’s Home” granted that the infant is not more than 72 hours old
Safely Surrendered Baby). Once an infant has been surrendered, “County of Orange social
workers place safe surrender children in a licensed foster home while finding the best adoptive
family for the infant” (Pedroza). One organization that has been involved with the Safely
Surrendered Baby Law is the Raise Foundation, which seeks to prevent child abuse in Orange
County. On their website, they provide information on the procedures necessary to surrender a
baby. Some of these steps include providing a medical history form and attaching an ID bracelet
to the infant’s ankle in the case they want to get their baby back (“Safe Surrender,” The Raise
Foundation).
Regarding Orange County’s specific policy, multiple changes have been made to further
provide safety for infants should they be surrendered. These changes include new guidelines for
“designating Safely Surrendered Baby (SSB) referrals/cases as sensitive or highly sensitive,
responding to a non-surrendering parent seeking custody of a safely surrendered baby,
notification of SSB referrals to Resource Family Approval (RFA) programs, restricting the
sealing of SSB referrals/cases, relative placement requests.” To surrender a child, the infant must
be voluntarily given up, placed at a designated surrender location, cannot be more than 72 hours
old, and cannot show signs of abuse. These conditions apply even if the mother has a hospital
birth and then decides to give up her baby. In the case that a parent decides they want their child
back, they “may reclaim the child within 14 days of the surrender” (“Safely Surrendered
Babies,” Social Services Agency, page 2). This policy has been put into place by Orange County
to reduce the amount of infants dying from abandonment. Through the Safely Surrendered Baby
law, infants can be saved from such death, given that their parent voluntarily gives them up.
Throughout the research conducted on this policy, it was difficult to find any
controversies surrounding this subject. Given that the policy looks to reduce infant deaths due to
abandonment, controversy has not really been present regarding the safe surrender of babies. If
anything, this policy has experienced great success. Since 2001 when the law was first
established, the amount of abandoned babies has significantly gone down (Ball). And again,
more than 900 babies have been surrendered since the creation of this law (“Safely Surrendered
Baby”). If anything, the only controversy that has come from this is Orange County did not
practice this policy sooner. In 2005, the county looked to add more “drop-off sites,” so to speak,
“when a passerby found an hours-old baby in a San Juan Capistrano trash bin” This incident
caused Orange County to introduce over 100 fire stations as places to surrender infants. (Pasco).
The enactment of this policy has had a huge impact on Orange County and more so,
California. Knowing that parents can surrender a baby with no questions asked gives them
reassurance and lessens the guilt or shame they may be experiencing. Another impact is that less
babies are dying to abandonment and more are being given a better chance at life with parents
who can provide for and nurture them. Given all of this, it does seem to be an effective policy. It
gives parents a solution and they can know that their child will be taken care of, first in a foster
home and eventually with an adoptive family. If any alternatives are needed, perhaps police
stations could also be a designated site for parents to surrender an infant. The only downside to
this is a police station may be more intimidating and may feel less anonymous to parents.
Another alternative could be to increase the age a child has to be a little bit more. Texas gives
parents up to 60 days to surrender their child (Ball). Seeing as how parents have 3 days to give
up their child but 14 days to reclaim their child (“Safely Surrendered Babies,” Social Services
Agency,), it might take longer than 3 days to make this important decision. Therefore, it might
not be such a bad thing to lengthen the amount of time a parent has to surrender their child. Other
than that, this is an effective policy, which has already shown signs of success and saved the
lives of many infants.
Works Cited
Ball, Jordan. “5 Things to Know about California’s Safely Surrender Baby Laws.” KXTV,
KXTV, 22 May 2017, www.abc10.com/article/news/health/5-things-to-know-aboutcalifornias-safely-surrender-baby-laws/441900720.
“CDSS Programs.” CDSS Public Site > Home, State of California, www.cdss.ca.gov/
inforesources/Safely-Surrendered-Baby.
Pasco, Jean O. “O.C. Expected to Add to Baby-Haven Sites.” Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles
Times, 28 Apr. 2005, www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2005-apr-28-me-babies28story.html.
Pedroza, Art. “Safe Surrender Is Saving the Lives of Babies in Orange County.” New Santa Ana,
New Santa Ana, 11 Aug. 2017, newsantaana.com/2017/08/11/safe-surrender-is-savingthe-lives-of-babies-in-orange-county/.
“Safely Surrendered Babies.” Social Services Agency, OC Gov, 6 Nov. 2017, ssa.ocgov.com/
civicax/filebank/blobdload.aspx?BlobID=70075.
“Safely Surrendered Baby,”
www.ochealthinfo.com/civicax/filebank/blobdload.aspx?BlobID=21060.
“Safe Surrender.” The Raise Foundation, The Raise Foundation, theraisefoundation.org/safesurrender/.
CJ 303 Writing Assignment
Criminal Justice Policy and Procedure Evaluation
In the halls of government public policies and procedures are continuously being defined, developed,
implemented and evaluated for the purposes of achieving certain goals that are considered to be in the
best interest of the citizenry. Policies are the guiding principles that are usually expressed in broad terms
and are often statements of ‘what’ or ‘why’. Procedures are the directions that inform people how a
policy is to be implemented. In that regard, procedures are most often concerned with answering the
‘how’, ‘when’, and ‘who’. For instance, if the goal of a school district is to reduce or eliminate instances
of bullying, it will develop some broad policies that outline a range of actions intended to achieve that
goal. This is the first paragraph of San Diego Unified’ s Anti-Bullying and Intimidation Prohibition Policy:
In its commitment to providing all students and staff with a safe learning environment where everyone is treated with
respect and no one is physically or emotionally harmed, the Board of Education will not tolerate any student or staff
member being bullied (including cyber‐bullying) or intimidated in any form at school or school‐related events, (including
off‐campus events, school‐sponsored activities, school buses, any event related to school business), or outside of
school hours with the intention to be carried out during any of the above.
The policy itself, as you can see, says nothing about how you are going to achieve that goal, nor should
it. It’s the procedures themselves that describe the processes for achieving the goal and will be much
longer. Another word you should be familiar with is programs. Programs are the organizational means
by which a policy is implemented. It links policies with the procedures that are necessary to achieve a
goal. It also helps the public understand what the department is trying to achieve. Oftentimes programs
and policies are used interchangeably but they are different.
Example
Policy: The Sheriff’s Department needs to ensure that at risk adults (those suffering from Alzheimer’s,
dementia etc.) who wander away from their homes can be tracked as quickly as possible.
Program: Take Me Home Program, a regional photo-based information system
Procedures: How do I enter the program? Who is eligible? When can I submit an application?
ASSIGNMENT
You are to write a double spaced three page paper (not including a citation page) that researches a
single policy or program that has been implemented by a law enforcement agency, court system or
corrections system. You may choose any of the following as your topic. If there is a program or policy
you wish to assess that is not on this list, please clear with me beforehand. The policy or program must
be very specific. Do not write about Stop and Frisk policies, write about the stop and frisk policy of a
specific agency. Likewise, do not write about prison privatization generally, instead write about the
policies of a particular county, state, etc. Here are the elements you must include in your paper:





Identify the problem the policy or program sought to address. Indicate the reasons, history, or
intent that led to the creation of the program or policy. Be specific!
Review the history of the particular policy or program
Discuss any controversies the enactment of the policy or program created
Analyze the impact of the policy/program and discuss any controversies it has generated.
Evaluate the effectiveness of the policy and briefly discuss any alternatives
Again, this is a short paper and I don’t expect you to touch on every element you may find. You will need
to be concise and specific. Cite your sources (use at least two) and use one of the standard styles (APA,
MLA). You do not need to use a title page, but I expect a citation page.
Grading/Due Date
20 points
10 points-Organization, structure and focus


How well do you define your policy?
How well to you focus on specific elements of your policy?
10 points-Writing quality and style

How well to you write about your policy?
Paper is due no later than 1159 PM Monday, December 9th, 2019. All papers must be submitted as
either a .doc or .docx file. No other file types will be accepted. Papers will be evaluated by SafeAssign for
originality..
Late papers will have the score deducted by 3 points
Finally as a reminder, your paper needs to be formal, concise, straightforward, organized, logical,
thoughtful, well researched, well supported, and well written. Basically, make it interesting. The best
way to do that is choose a topic that interests you.
POSSIBLE TOPICS (but please don’t limit yourself to just these)
Police
Stop and Frisk (any police department other than NYC)
Immigration and local law enforcement (any department/state other than Arizona)
Use of Force
Courts/Judicial System
Jury Selection
Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
Sentencing Reform (Three Strikes, etc.)
Corrections
Prison Privatization
Prison and the Mentally Ill
Women in Prison
Cook County, IL Mental Health Transition Center
Prior to the 1960s, individuals with a mental illness were generally institutionalized
in mental health hospitals that provided them with care and kept them out of the public
sphere. However, in 1963, congress passed the Community Mental Health Act, which
inadvertently led to the rapid deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill. As an unfortunate
side effect, the corrections department was burdened with housing these individuals, many
of whom suffered from homelessness and found their way into the criminal justice system
through crimes like theft, drug use, and even aggression. This burden is especially felt in
Illinois where the Cook County Jail, one of the nation’s largest jails – along with Rikers
Island in New York and the county jail in Los Angeles – has had to deal with federal
oversight regarding the treatment and mistreatment of mentally ill (Williams). Under the
leadership of Sheriff Thomas J. Dart, the creation of the Cook County Mental Health
Transition Center has provided specialized care of mentally ill inmates and has included
programs like group counseling, education, and substance abuse workshops (“Mental
Health Template”).
Between 2009 and 2012, Illinois made the fourth largest cuts to mental health
services of any state and consolidated 6/12 mental health institutions under the claim that
these cuts would lead to $2 million in savings (Collins, “State that Gutted Mental Health
Services”). However, cutting these services wound up burdening the correctional
department, which sees 39% of arrestees at Cook County Jail intake that self-identify as
mentally ill (“The State of Warrants in Cook County”). According to Sheriff Dart, “You’ve got
somebody who’s been picked up and removed from the street with some type of mental
illness. Instead of treating them… you basically just churn them into the criminal justice
system—which was never set up for these people” (Ford). Similar sentiments, were
mirrored by a monitor appointed by the U.S. District Court in Peoria who’s testimony
regarding the negligent use of segregated cells to house mentally ill inmates led the federal
court to mandate that the Illinois Department of Corrections improve its prison services
(Collins, “Illinois County Rehabilitated Mentally Ill Offenders Through Treatment”).
The heart of these reforms is the Metal Health Transition Center, which is designed
to help inmates cope with their mental illness and prepare to return to life on the outside
(Ford). These programs are comprised of phases, which include daily group therapy
sessions, classroom education, job-readiness training, and even gardening (Ford). Sheriff
Dart’s work with the Center has been incredibly successful. Since 2013, the Cook County
Jail’s population has decreased by 20% and recidivism rates are down as well (“The State of
Warrants in Cook County”). Furthermore, in a study following 43 former inmates who
attended the program before being released, none of those inmates have been rearrested
(Williams). The success of these programs is also seen in the testimonies of former inmates,
such as Luvell Pierre Gipson who stated that, “The program gave me the opportunity to
think about my behavior… I gained the tools of negotiation, anger management, and
conflict resolution” (Collins, “Illinois County Rehabilitated Mentally Ill Offenders Through
Treatment”).
Due to the success of the Mental Health Transition Center and its programs, there
has been little controversy surrounding it. This also has to do, in part, with the fact that
these reforms needed to happen as mandated by the May 2013 court order. That being
said, however, some are still reluctant to rely on jail diversion programs as an answer to
the national problem of recidivism and two-thirds of courts continue to punish offenders
with more jail time if they fail to complete treatment programs (Collins, “Illinois County
Rehabilitated Mentally Ill Offenders Through Treatment”). Although these new reforms are
effective, there are certainly ways that the Cook County Corrections system can improve
the Mental Health Transition Center and its programs. Currently, inmates have to apply and
be selected in order to benefit from the programs. This does little to address the hundreds
of mentally ill inmates in the system that have no access to these programs. One potential
alternative to this would be creating programs that are accessible to all inmates. If there
are issues regarding finances or safety, then resources could go towards ways of
disseminating the same information, such as through brochures or fliers that can be viewed
by inmates. Another alternative could be organizing housing or group exercises in such a
way that inmates partaking in these programs could reteach the information and
techniques to smaller groups of their fellow inmates. One final alternative would be to
provide more comprehensive training for prison guards and staff in handling mentally ill
inmates. Granted the role of a prison guard is not to act as a therapist, but even just a basic
understanding of the different mental illnesses that affect individuals could be extremely
helpful in reducing instances of violence against or maltreatment of mentally ill individuals.
Given the fact that caring for a mentally ill prisoner costs the Illinois Department of
Corrections nearly three times as much as the $143 per day it costs to jail an average
person, it would be wise to continue to invest in programs like the Mental Health
Transition Center in an effort to reduce recidivism and ultimately save money (Collins,
“State That Gutted Mental Health Services”).
Works Cited
“A Mental Health Template for American Jails.” Cook County Sheriff -A Mental Health
Template for American Jails, 2017, www.cookcountysheriff.org.
Collins, Sam P.K. “State That Gutted Mental Health Services Finally Has A Plan To Help
Mentally Ill Inmates.” ThinkProgress, ThinkProgress, 11 Nov. 2014, Web.
Collins, Sam P.K. “What Happened When An Illinois County Rehabilitated Mentally Ill
Offenders Through Treatment.” ThinkProgress, ThinkProgress, 18 Sep. 2015, Web.
Ford, Matt. “America’s Largest Mental Health Hospital is a Jail.” The Atlantic, 8 June 2015,
Web.
“The State of Warrants in Cook County.” Cook County Sheriff’s Office – Home Page, 2017,
www.cookcountysheriff.org.
Williams, Timothy. “A Psychologist as a Warden? Jail and Mental Illness Intersect in
Chicago.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 30 July 2015, Web.
On the 1st of June 2016, the Baltimore Police department changed their use of
force policy, and under Policy 1115 emphasized that their focus with respect to
the use of force is on “the sanctity of human life”.1 The main objective of the
policy implemented was to ensure that officers “value and preserve human life in
all situations”.2 The following policy was implemented due to rising tension
between the people of Baltimore and the Baltimore police as a result of increased
publicity on the polices’ excessive use of force, in particular, towards minorities.
Although the effectiveness of the program is difficult to ascertain, there are some
who have suggested certain amendments which will increase the policies
effectiveness.
Policy 1115 was implemented in response to growing disdain towards Baltimore
police due to widespread news coverage of police brutality throughout America,
and in particular the brutality that was occurring in the city of Baltimore. In
2015, a 25-year-old African-American man, Freddie Carlos Gray Jr. suffered
spinal cord injuries due to the unnecessary excessive use of force of Baltimore
police, and as a result died a week later. It was also established that Gray was
falsely arrested.3. This was seen by many Baltimore residents as symbolic of how
their police were treating their citizens and as a result violent and destructive
protests occurred in downtown Baltimore on April 25th, 2015.4 Such protests
“Use of force: Policy 1115”, Bal…

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